Exhibition & environmental Design | Socially Engaged Art

 

The exhibition was first viewed at the American Swedish Institute in Minneapolis opening on February 28th. The active collaboration with ASI is connecting the project to museums both nationally and internationally as potential for this exhibit to travel. As a result, we presented the project to curator Jeanette Peterberg of the Nobel Museums.

The hope is that this project will continue to develop to have a much larger platform as a commitment, process and environment for peacemaking. The conversation surrounding peace. The intended outcome is to present this work to a public audience while encouraging visitors to actively participate in exploring the rich history of the Nobel Peace Prize and contributing their own ideas as agents of peace. The Shaping Peace project is lead by Christopher Houltberg (Art and Design professor). There are five other contributing faculty members including: Julie Longo (Art Adjunct), Robert Tom (Art), Joe Underhill (Political Science), Matthew Maruggi (Religion) and Stephen Clark (English).

Shaping Peace is an interactive exhibition that encouraged viewers to become participants in a conversation surrounding peace. This interdisciplinary project is a collaboration of 128 students and 6 faculty members at Augsburg College from various disciplines including Art and Design, English, Music, Political Science and Religion. By creating a visual exploration of the past 128 Nobel Peace Prize laureates, the exhibition attempts to broaden the awareness of this prestigious prize and, quite literally, put it in the hands of the viewer. The exhibition included 128 cubes (20 inches each) representing each of the Nobel Peace Prize Laureates, as well as quotes and large-scale wall graphics. Each cube has been designed to include biographical information, original artwork and tweet-length text (140 characters or less) created in response to the winner. There were instructions and prompts for viewers to explore thematic and historic connections among the cubes. After exploring these cubes, viewers were encouraged to become participants in the second part of the exhibition. There was 1,600 blank clay medals produced by hand for an interactive/reflective installation. Viewers were invited to respond to the history of the Nobel Peace Prize and add their own symbol, thought or response on an individual medal. These medals were then displayed in the environment and became part of the conversation surrounding peace. The intended outcome was to present this work to a public audience while encouraging visitors to actively participate in exploring the rich history of the Nobel Peace Prize and contributing their own ideas as agents of peace.